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Quantum Physics
10-02-2015, 03:03 PM
Post: #1
What's everybody's knowledge about quantum physics?

Can we time travel and shift realities like people have been claiming?

I'm trying to manifest and change events in my personal timeline to correct and fix things to avoid painful circumstances in my personal life that could've been easily avoided.

Any help please? Thanks.
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10-02-2015, 03:15 PM (This post was last modified: 10-02-2015 03:16 PM by TheDragonKing.)
Post: #2
Well....it is all at the end of the day just consciousness. But yoj would basically have to change a group of peoples consciousness to change something in relation to you as far as Fate change related circumstances. This is just commo. Sense...look at your own spell work and devise your own strategies.

Like what are you trying to avoid? Any examples?

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10-02-2015, 04:19 PM
Post: #3
I'm going to tell you all right now to not talk about this because I know already none of you know what you are talking about.

No, it's not possible to shift realities by modern models of quantum physics. No, quantum entanglement can't be used as information channels. No, magic has nothing to do with quantum physics.

Faust.
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10-02-2015, 04:47 PM
Post: #4
All the more reason why I asked. I never claimed that I did. I just had questions that needed answers.

How about post modern quantum physics? lol =P
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10-02-2015, 06:37 PM (This post was last modified: 10-02-2015 06:38 PM by Faust.)
Post: #5
The modern model of quantum physics? I'll try to simplify it as much as possible.

For a non-relativistic 1-dimensional particle at time t, the probability of finding it at position x is equal to the wavefunction in the form e^i(kx-wt), where k and w are constants related to the wavelength and amplitude ([i]not respectively[i]). This equation gives rise to a normalization condition: the integral from negative infinity to infinity of e^i(kx-wt) is always equal to one, ie, there is a 100% chance of finding the particle at some point in time and space.

The main, most interesting part of quantum mechanics is that two wavefunctions can be "appended" to each other in a condition called superposition. Let's imagine that I have a box with a non-relativistic 1-dimensional particle that has a 50% chance of being in state 1(wavefunction 1), and a 50% chance of being in state 2 (wavefunction 2). If I open it at time t, then the probability of me finding the particle at position x is equal to the sum of wavefunction 1 and wavefunction 2.

As for entanglement, I'm only going to say one thing: no-communication theorem.

Faust.
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10-02-2015, 06:40 PM (This post was last modified: 10-02-2015 06:45 PM by radicalrave.)
Post: #6
haha, that's cool, I actually was able to comprehend and understand that.

The last part is new to me, no-communication theorem./

Can you explain that to me?

I'll look it up right now actually.

Whoo... that is some creepy stuff.

I can see now. It's an issue with the observer's view, because they don't know if any learning or change has taken place to come and even be measured.

That almost kind of reminds me of Schroedinger's Cat experiments.
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03-17-2016, 11:23 AM (This post was last modified: 03-17-2016 11:27 AM by January.)
Post: #7
that sounds about right...
im going to edit this comment later
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03-18-2016, 10:05 PM (This post was last modified: 03-19-2016 12:42 AM by Knight of the Temple.)
Post: #8
(10-02-2015 04:19 PM)Faust Wrote:  No, magic has nothing to do with quantum physics.

Given that it relegates the determininic mechanics and corpuscular atomism of classical physics at the ontological level to the dustbin of history, and that these very concepts had been used to dismiss the pre-modern metaphysics of reality as primitive superstition, that's a very bold statement. Quantum theory rules out the existence of hidden physical variables in the face of experimental results while providing no causative mechanism for why particular eigenvalues of observables are measured in any single case, whereas logic demands a sufficient reason for something to be one way and not another.

For the occultists, this is not at all surprising, since he already knows that ultimate efficient causes that shape the material world are not themselves material but spiritual actions that transcend it.
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03-18-2016, 10:11 PM
Post: #9
https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=BNsrK6P9QvI

^^ this

I provide card reading services of all kinds, pm me with your questions and needs.
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03-18-2016, 10:43 PM
Post: #10
(10-02-2015 06:37 PM)Faust Wrote:  The modern model of quantum physics? I'll try to simplify it as much as possible.

For a non-relativistic 1-dimensional particle at time t, the probability of finding it at position x is equal to the wavefunction in the form e^i(kx-wt), where k and w are constants related to the wavelength and amplitude (not respectively[i]).

No it isn't. One has to integrate the proability density with respect to x over some interval to obtain the probability of the particle being found to lie within that interval. "The probability of finding it at position x" is most certainly not equal to the wavefunction, which is not even real-valued and thus cannot itself represent a probability.

(10-02-2015 06:37 PM)Faust Wrote:  This equation gives rise to a normalization condition: the integral from negative infinity to infinity of e^i(kx-wt) is always equal to one, ie, there is a 100% chance of finding the particle at some point in time and space.

Wrong again. One doesn't integrate the wavefunction, but its modulus squared, i.e. it multiplied by its complex conjugate. Moreover, the integral of the normalisation condition is over all space with respect to space, not time, i.e. the particle has a probability of 1 of being found somewhere within space [i]at time t. That this ideal, non-interacting particle exists for all time if it exists at any time is already implied in describing its complete state by a plane wave function.


(10-02-2015 06:37 PM)Faust Wrote:  I'm going to tell you all right now to not talk about this because I know already none of you know what you are talking about.

Right back at ya, mate.

Seriously, what is it with someone coming one here telling others they don't know what they are talking about when he himself can't even get the most basic application of quantum mechanical postulates correct in his "simplified" exposition that is supposed to impress laypeople?
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