Post Reply 
 
Thread Rating:
  • 0 Vote(s) - 0 Average
  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
Santeria Graverobbing?
12-07-2015, 10:31 PM
Post: #1
http://www.wfsb.com/story/30682104/hartf...ce-a-judge

I knew a Hartford detective some years back who told me that ritual crime in and around the area was a lot more prevalent than the media lets on, primarily because a lot of it is swept under the rug so to speak before the news can get a hold of the stories.

I don't know much about Santeria, so if there is someone on here who does, I ask: Is this common? Do practitioners use bones and obtain them like this? Or is this guy not representative of ordinary practice? If he is, I find this very disrespectful to the departed and the families.

*Peace*Infinity*Power*
Ankh-em-Maat
Find all posts by this user
Quote this message in a reply
12-16-2015, 06:48 AM
Post: #2
(12-07-2015 10:31 PM)rzarector Wrote:  I don't know much about Santeria, so if there is someone on here who does, I ask: Is this common? Do practitioners use bones and obtain them like this? Or is this guy not representative of ordinary practice? If he is, I find this very disrespectful to the departed and the families.

Lukumi, Ocha, and Ifa are all names of practices typically generalized as "Santeria". That being said: NO. Within the practices of Santeria there is no need for human bones to work with the spirits.

Now, in certain Palo houses, human remains are REQUIRED for the prenda which will become the Nganga that a high ranking Tata will receive license to work with. Usually, the bones are smuggled into the country through various means, but they are typically bought from cemetery caretakers as space in cemeteries is "rented" in the islands. When the family cannot or nor long cares to pay for their interred relatives, they bones are often dumped into either a group sepulcher or even thrown in the garbage. The use of bones is common within Haitian Vodou, but typically they are passed down through houses in the succession of high ranking priests.

Honestly, I don't see anything disrespectful about using bones more than seven years old, because the person is certainly not using them anymore. In Haiti if you are an houngan you can more or less expect someone to dig you up after seven years to put your bones to work.

(Click to find my site and blog!)
[Image: o98qQ18.jpg]

I serve God with my right hand and the Devil with my left.
Visit this user's website Find all posts by this user
Quote this message in a reply
12-16-2015, 09:23 PM
Post: #3
(12-16-2015 06:48 AM)Fouchèt Nan Pwen Wrote:  Lukumi, Ocha, and Ifa are all names of practices typically generalized as "Santeria". That being said: NO. Within the practices of Santeria there is no need for human bones to work with the spirits.

Now, in certain Palo houses, human remains are REQUIRED for the prenda which will become the Nganga that a high ranking Tata will receive license to work with. Usually, the bones are smuggled into the country through various means, but they are typically bought from cemetery caretakers as space in cemeteries is "rented" in the islands. When the family cannot or nor long cares to pay for their interred relatives, they bones are often dumped into either a group sepulcher or even thrown in the garbage. The use of bones is common within Haitian Vodou, but typically they are passed down through houses in the succession of high ranking priests.

Honestly, I don't see anything disrespectful about using bones more than seven years old, because the person is certainly not using them anymore. In Haiti if you are an houngan you can more or less expect someone to dig you up after seven years to put your bones to work.

Good info, thanks. But why seven years? If a person isn't linked to their bones after seven years, then why use them at all? To seat another spirit? Because then you could use other items that don't require disturbing memorials (or a lot of money if you're going the ethical route).

*Peace*Infinity*Power*
Ankh-em-Maat
Find all posts by this user
Quote this message in a reply
12-16-2015, 09:26 PM
Post: #4
(12-16-2015 09:23 PM)rzarector Wrote:  
(12-16-2015 06:48 AM)Fouchèt Nan Pwen Wrote:  Lukumi, Ocha, and Ifa are all names of practices typically generalized as "Santeria". That being said: NO. Within the practices of Santeria there is no need for human bones to work with the spirits.

Now, in certain Palo houses, human remains are REQUIRED for the prenda which will become the Nganga that a high ranking Tata will receive license to work with. Usually, the bones are smuggled into the country through various means, but they are typically bought from cemetery caretakers as space in cemeteries is "rented" in the islands. When the family cannot or nor long cares to pay for their interred relatives, they bones are often dumped into either a group sepulcher or even thrown in the garbage. The use of bones is common within Haitian Vodou, but typically they are passed down through houses in the succession of high ranking priests.

Honestly, I don't see anything disrespectful about using bones more than seven years old, because the person is certainly not using them anymore. In Haiti if you are an houngan you can more or less expect someone to dig you up after seven years to put your bones to work.

Good info, thanks. But why seven years? If a person isn't linked to their bones after seven years, then why use them at all? To seat another spirit? Because then you could use other items that don't require disturbing memorials (or a lot of money if you're going the ethical route).

Seven years allows a certain part of the soul to move on while the reflexive "animal part" remains. When a spirit is seated on bones, that spirit becomes more potent than any other medium that can be used. It is a very complex and dangerous process but the end result is quite rewarding. The powder that can be made from such bones is ridiculously potent, that just a few grains can work very heavy magic.

(Click to find my site and blog!)
[Image: o98qQ18.jpg]

I serve God with my right hand and the Devil with my left.
Visit this user's website Find all posts by this user
Quote this message in a reply
12-17-2015, 03:26 AM
Post: #5
(12-16-2015 09:26 PM)Fouchèt Nan Pwen Wrote:  Seven years allows a certain part of the soul to move on while the reflexive "animal part" remains. When a spirit is seated on bones, that spirit becomes more potent than any other medium that can be used. It is a very complex and dangerous process but the end result is quite rewarding. The powder that can be made from such bones is ridiculously potent, that just a few grains can work very heavy magic.

Somewhat off topic now, but this reminds me a bit of the ancient Egyptian astragals used in some forms of their divination. They would remove a certain bone from the ankle ("astragalus") of a dead cattle to use in a throwing form of divination. They had a process whereby they would clean, wash and dedicate the bone for use. And of course given their lack of demarcation between Magick and divination these bones were considered potent in such work as well. I haven't come across any references of them seating spirits in the astragals, but the idea of bones being such powerful instruments is widespread.

*Peace*Infinity*Power*
Ankh-em-Maat
Find all posts by this user
Quote this message in a reply
Post Reply 


Forum Jump:


User(s) browsing this thread: 1 Guest(s)