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[Archive] [The God-King] The Truth About Curses and Black Magic

A thread that was copied from the original Wizard Forums.

Mart

Chaos Alchemist
Archivist
Joined
Apr 20, 2021
Messages
178
Points
43
It is widely regarded within the magical community that magic is neither good nor evil, rather neutral. Like a gun, it is the intent of the person utilizing it that is good or evil. Though, it can be surmised that the term white magic is magic that is beneficial to the magician or those he casts the spell(s) on whereas as black magic is meant to harm (or force) those the magician casts the spell on.

Being that I am Wiccan it should be noted that in 99% of the books written on the subject do not deal in black magic. If the book mentions it, it is simply to warn the reader to stay away from such workings and those that practice it are weak. This couldn't be further from the truth. Black magic is widely taught in the Wiccan faith, though it is reserved for those practitioners who have attained higher levels of consciousness and degree (such as Priests, High Priests/Priestesses, Witch Kings and Witch Queens, etc). Black magic can be a very powerful tool. It can bring the magician the world if he so desires and uses the art correctly. It can also bring about his destruction.

But what of karma and/or the Threefold Law? If one casts a curse or performs other such dark rites won't their karma come back to bite them in the ass? While karma itself is indeed very real, our "knowledge" on the subject is severely diluted. I will refer you to a quote from renowned Black Magician E.A. Koetting (get his books if you haven't read them):


let's talk about this
"karma" idea for a minute.
There's this lie that been going around for
a few years now that I just have to confront.
It's the idea that "What you do comes back
to you threefold... or more!"
This is asinine.
The whole idea of karma, seen in this way,
holds no more evidentiary water than the idea
that "God" blesses those who are faithful.
Often, the most faithful, the most disciplined
servants of God or Yahwey or Allah are the
poorest, and hardly ever seem to get a leg
up in the world, while those who take for
themselves that which they can succeed.
The apologists retort that "their reward
is in the next life, and will be eternal."
Oh really? Have they seen this next life
with their own eyes? Have they mapped its
landscapes and come back with sure methods by
which all people can travel there NOW and see
for themselves?
No, they haven't. You'll have to wait until
you're dead, but that's all part of the test,
right?
none of that is what the idea of
karma is all about anyways.
The idea of karma comes from the Hindu
religion, one of the few remaining religions
in widespread practice that still allows for
the gained understanding of man's own godhood,
although through allegory and allusion, rather
than through a path as direct as what I'm doing
here with the Become A Living God project.
In the scriptural text, the Bhagavad-Gita,
the manifestation of Godhood tells his
listener, Arjuna, a few things that might
enlighten us concerning karma.
"The ultimate purpose of Vedic knowledge
is to detach oneself from the entanglement of
the material world and to understand Lord
Krishna as the Supreme Personality of Godhead.
One who understands Krishna's supreme identity
surrenders unto Him and engages in His dharma."

We understand, from referencing other
vedic texts, as well as the teachings of
established Yogis and our own experiences
in the worlds of spirit that Krishna is only
manifesting as an external entity, but that
he is symbolic of Supersoul, which is within
all of us, and which is what I call the God-
Self.
The word "Dharma" here means daily obligations,
devotional practices, and that sort of thing, but
the word can really be taken to mean, "That which
should be done."
There are two types of dharma. The first
relates to daily duties, obligations, familial
interests, national and religious obligations,
societal importances, etc.
The second, and more interesting sort of
dharma, though, is spiritual dharma, which is
unseen, unknown, and continually unraveling.
This type of dharma is "that which should
be done, and which no other person can do."
In other words, this sort of dharma can
otherwise be called "Destiny."
Krishna goes on to say to Arjuna, who asks
whether he should go forth into battle and kill
many of his fellow men:

"The material body of the indestructible, immeasurable
and eternal living entity is sure to come to an end;
therefore, fight, O descendant of Bharata Neither he who
thinks the living entity the slayer nor he who thinks it
slain is in knowledge, for the self slays not nor is
slain.Considering your specific duty as a kshatriya,
you should know that there is no better engagement for
you than fighting on religious principles; and so
there is no need for hesitation. "If, however, you
do not fulfill your dharma of fighting, then you will
certainly incur sins for neglecting your duties and
thus lose your reputation as a fighterO son of Kunti,
either you will be killed on the battlefield and
attain the heavenly planets, or you will conquer
and enjoy the earthly kingdom. Therefore get up and
fight with determination."

Krishna obviously could see into the dharma of
Arjuna, and saw that it was his political, religious,
and social dharma to go into battle and to kill.
There is the added possibility that the wealth and
success that Arjuna would enjoy after such a battle
would act as a stepping stone to the fulfillment
of his greater, spiritual dharma.
Krishna also warns that if Arjuna does not
fulfill his dharma, that there would be negative
consequences. In his case, as in every other case,
the consequences are natural, rather than supernatural
or interventionary in any manner.
Thus, the idea of karma was born.
Fulfull that which you must do, and strive
towards the fulfillment of that which should be done
that only you can do. It's like the golden rule,
with the twist of "Do unto myself that which I want
done to myself."
And for God's sake, don't go into life armed
with a thousand powers and armies of spirits, afraid
to use them because of some other people's mis-
understanding of this fundamental law of dharma and
karma!


As you can see, the black magus does not fear karma for they understand its true meaning. Now I am not saying to begin going out and cursing everyone who has done ill towards you or your friends/family and to begin forcing people to fall in love with you or to control others using magical means. I am simply opening the closed eyes to the other side of magic. You see, early in my magical training I found out the true meaning of magical balance. Many Magic 101 books may hint on the fact that magic must be in harmony with the elements, planetary alignments and even within the magician themselves. But they never go into the fact that magic must be balanced with nature. Nature is neither good nor evil. We see the beauty of nature, such as the islands in the Caribbean, the rain forests of the Amazon and the natural waterfalls of Africa. We also see the destruction nature can cause such as hurricanes, tsunamis, earthquakes, monsoons, etc.

If nature can be both dark and light, constructive and destructive, then why cannot the practitioner? We are taught that magic is natural, so it is of nature. We take the energy from nature and manipulate it our will, do we not? Why must we subject ourselves to only experiencing one side of nature when nature is dualistic? The answer is we should not be. There are times when cursing someone is necessary. There are times when hexing someone may be necessary. Or, to be honest, who cares about your reasoning. You are the magician and if you feel someone deserves some sort of "instant karma" if you will, then give it to them. Again, that is not to say to go and curse the bully from 5th grade who took your lunch money. But every practitioner should be well informed on both the light and dark aspects of magic to make a mature decision. I have done my fair share of causing illness in this person, causing that person to lose their job or this couple over here to break up. I have my reasons and I felt it necessary. These things aren't taught in the books you can buy from Barnes & Noble, Amazon or Llewellyn. So if you wish to venture into the darker side of magic, the baneful arts, you should do so with an open mind. Know that those who are of a more sinister nature in the magical arts do not care for moral reasoning and judgement. They know that black magic can bring them anything and everything the Wicca 101 books cant....and so....they go for it.
 

Fausto

Neophyte
Joined
May 1, 2021
Messages
34
Points
8
It is widely regarded within the magical community that magic is neither good nor evil, rather neutral. Like a gun, it is the intent of the person utilizing it that is good or evil. Though, it can be surmised that the term white magic is magic that is beneficial to the magician or those he casts the spell(s) on whereas as black magic is meant to harm (or force) those the magician casts the spell on.

Being that I am Wiccan it should be noted that in 99% of the books written on the subject do not deal in black magic. If the book mentions it, it is simply to warn the reader to stay away from such workings and those that practice it are weak. This couldn't be further from the truth. Black magic is widely taught in the Wiccan faith, though it is reserved for those practitioners who have attained higher levels of consciousness and degree (such as Priests, High Priests/Priestesses, Witch Kings and Witch Queens, etc). Black magic can be a very powerful tool. It can bring the magician the world if he so desires and uses the art correctly. It can also bring about his destruction.

But what of karma and/or the Threefold Law? If one casts a curse or performs other such dark rites won't their karma come back to bite them in the ass? While karma itself is indeed very real, our "knowledge" on the subject is severely diluted. I will refer you to a quote from renowned Black Magician E.A. Koetting (get his books if you haven't read them):


let's talk about this
"karma" idea for a minute.
There's this lie that been going around for
a few years now that I just have to confront.
It's the idea that "What you do comes back
to you threefold... or more!"
This is asinine.
The whole idea of karma, seen in this way,
holds no more evidentiary water than the idea
that "God" blesses those who are faithful.
Often, the most faithful, the most disciplined
servants of God or Yahwey or Allah are the
poorest, and hardly ever seem to get a leg
up in the world, while those who take for
themselves that which they can succeed.
The apologists retort that "their reward
is in the next life, and will be eternal."
Oh really? Have they seen this next life
with their own eyes? Have they mapped its
landscapes and come back with sure methods by
which all people can travel there NOW and see
for themselves?
No, they haven't. You'll have to wait until
you're dead, but that's all part of the test,
right?
none of that is what the idea of
karma is all about anyways.
The idea of karma comes from the Hindu
religion, one of the few remaining religions
in widespread practice that still allows for
the gained understanding of man's own godhood,
although through allegory and allusion, rather
than through a path as direct as what I'm doing
here with the Become A Living God project.
In the scriptural text, the Bhagavad-Gita,
the manifestation of Godhood tells his
listener, Arjuna, a few things that might
enlighten us concerning karma.
"The ultimate purpose of Vedic knowledge
is to detach oneself from the entanglement of
the material world and to understand Lord
Krishna as the Supreme Personality of Godhead.
One who understands Krishna's supreme identity
surrenders unto Him and engages in His dharma."

We understand, from referencing other
vedic texts, as well as the teachings of
established Yogis and our own experiences
in the worlds of spirit that Krishna is only
manifesting as an external entity, but that
he is symbolic of Supersoul, which is within
all of us, and which is what I call the God-
Self.
The word "Dharma" here means daily obligations,
devotional practices, and that sort of thing, but
the word can really be taken to mean, "That which
should be done."
There are two types of dharma. The first
relates to daily duties, obligations, familial
interests, national and religious obligations,
societal importances, etc.
The second, and more interesting sort of
dharma, though, is spiritual dharma, which is
unseen, unknown, and continually unraveling.
This type of dharma is "that which should
be done, and which no other person can do."
In other words, this sort of dharma can
otherwise be called "Destiny."
Krishna goes on to say to Arjuna, who asks
whether he should go forth into battle and kill
many of his fellow men:

"The material body of the indestructible, immeasurable
and eternal living entity is sure to come to an end;
therefore, fight, O descendant of Bharata Neither he who
thinks the living entity the slayer nor he who thinks it
slain is in knowledge, for the self slays not nor is
slain.Considering your specific duty as a kshatriya,
you should know that there is no better engagement for
you than fighting on religious principles; and so
there is no need for hesitation. "If, however, you
do not fulfill your dharma of fighting, then you will
certainly incur sins for neglecting your duties and
thus lose your reputation as a fighterO son of Kunti,
either you will be killed on the battlefield and
attain the heavenly planets, or you will conquer
and enjoy the earthly kingdom. Therefore get up and
fight with determination."

Krishna obviously could see into the dharma of
Arjuna, and saw that it was his political, religious,
and social dharma to go into battle and to kill.
There is the added possibility that the wealth and
success that Arjuna would enjoy after such a battle
would act as a stepping stone to the fulfillment
of his greater, spiritual dharma.
Krishna also warns that if Arjuna does not
fulfill his dharma, that there would be negative
consequences. In his case, as in every other case,
the consequences are natural, rather than supernatural
or interventionary in any manner.
Thus, the idea of karma was born.
Fulfull that which you must do, and strive
towards the fulfillment of that which should be done
that only you can do. It's like the golden rule,
with the twist of "Do unto myself that which I want
done to myself."
And for God's sake, don't go into life armed
with a thousand powers and armies of spirits, afraid
to use them because of some other people's mis-
understanding of this fundamental law of dharma and
karma!


As you can see, the black magus does not fear karma for they understand its true meaning. Now I am not saying to begin going out and cursing everyone who has done ill towards you or your friends/family and to begin forcing people to fall in love with you or to control others using magical means. I am simply opening the closed eyes to the other side of magic. You see, early in my magical training I found out the true meaning of magical balance. Many Magic 101 books may hint on the fact that magic must be in harmony with the elements, planetary alignments and even within the magician themselves. But they never go into the fact that magic must be balanced with nature. Nature is neither good nor evil. We see the beauty of nature, such as the islands in the Caribbean, the rain forests of the Amazon and the natural waterfalls of Africa. We also see the destruction nature can cause such as hurricanes, tsunamis, earthquakes, monsoons, etc.

If nature can be both dark and light, constructive and destructive, then why cannot the practitioner? We are taught that magic is natural, so it is of nature. We take the energy from nature and manipulate it our will, do we not? Why must we subject ourselves to only experiencing one side of nature when nature is dualistic? The answer is we should not be. There are times when cursing someone is necessary. There are times when hexing someone may be necessary. Or, to be honest, who cares about your reasoning. You are the magician and if you feel someone deserves some sort of "instant karma" if you will, then give it to them. Again, that is not to say to go and curse the bully from 5th grade who took your lunch money. But every practitioner should be well informed on both the light and dark aspects of magic to make a mature decision. I have done my fair share of causing illness in this person, causing that person to lose their job or this couple over here to break up. I have my reasons and I felt it necessary. These things aren't taught in the books you can buy from Barnes & Noble, Amazon or Llewellyn. So if you wish to venture into the darker side of magic, the baneful arts, you should do so with an open mind. Know that those who are of a more sinister nature in the magical arts do not care for moral reasoning and judgement. They know that black magic can bring them anything and everything the Wicca 101 books cant....and so....they go for it.
The point, in my simple opinion, is that curses can not be done for everyone, it evolves many things here, and if you do not delimit such curses, they hit a whole family.
 
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